Search results for 'breakfast'

Beers at Breakfast – the next Dea Latis event

21 Nov

Stout and sausages?

Bitter with bacon?

Mild and a mushroom?

You get the idea….That’s right, the next Dea Latis event will be looking at the beers that best  match with breakfast!

On Friday, 7 December, we will be taking charge of the Parcel Yard pub at King’s Cross station from 10am to midday.

Top brewsters Sara Barton of Brewsters Brewery and Kathy Britton of Oldershaw Brewery will be guiding us through the tasting.

Tickets are £20 each and include a full breakfast (veggie option available), beer (of course), tea/coffee and the tutored tasting.  Afterwards there will be the opportunity for plenty of networking with women from the beer and pub industry.

Tickets are sold via EventBrite

http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/event/3809044956

Do You Pass the Bechdel Test?

22 Jan

Here’s Emma Inch’s article from December 2017 about how The Bechdel Test could be applied to the beer scene:

‘Beer people are lovely people!’ and ‘The beer industry is a wonderful, friendly place!’ are things I’ve been told on a number of occasions since jumping boots-first into the scene a couple of years ago. And, for me, there’s a lot of truth in these celebratory statements. I spent the first two decades of my working life in an environment where I didn’t always see the best of how things could be. As a frontline social worker – and more latterly, a social work academic – I bore witness to desperation, deprivation, and sometimes degradation on a scale most would find hard to contemplate. I met many, many good people on both sides of the intervention divide – some of the bravest, warmest, creative, most intelligent people there are – and I have a lasting respect for them all. I also derived a great deal of satisfaction from my work, and felt immensely privileged to work alongside people in some of the darkest times of their lives. But, in terms of a joyful working environment, I can’t honestly say that it comes close to chatting over a mash tun in a breath-cloud cold brewery just as the sun is rising, or being handed the fullest, maltiest, fattest barley wine by a proud brewer with a grin so wide it must sting, or discovering a taste that will pin you forever to location, a time, an emotion, a memory that  will leave you changed.

But I’m lucky. First up, I’m an old-school butch dyke. I have a quiff and a comb, a pocket watch and a pocket knife. I don’t understand make-up and I sometimes get challenged when using women’s toilets. Men are occasionally scared of me, often confused around me, and regularly amused by me, but I’m absolutely not the kind of woman they want to sleep with. Secondly, I host a beer and brewing radio show, I write about beer for publications in which people want their brews featured, I won a British Guild of Beer Writers Award for Best Online Beer Communicator (I know – I’m shocked too), and I have a website, a podcast, a blog, and so – to my face at least – both women and men in the beer industry are lovely, and the environment in which I work is a wonderful and friendly place.

But I’m aware that’s not everyone’s truth. I don’t need to experience harassment in order to believe the women who tell me they are regularly harassed. I don’t need to feel the creeping nastiness of the belittling, objectifying, ridiculing, rejecting, grabbing, groping, saliva-spraying face of sexism, to know that it exists within the beer industry. I just need to see the dodgy pumpclips, engage with social media, and note the absence of women from many respected platforms within the industry.

But, as someone with a voice that occasionally grabs attention, if I see injustice, I also need to do something more.

I first came across Alison Bechdel and her wonderful ‘Dykes to Watch Out For’ comic strip in the early-1990s when, as a newly ‘out’ lesbian I would scour literature to find any representation of queer culture. In those pre-Internet days, Bechdel’s funny, inspiring and moving series, populated by a cast of lesbians and their friends, was one of the few places where a sympathetic portrayal of ‘women like me’ could be found. Complete with their interests, intricacies and insecurities, Mo, Sydney, Clarice and Toni, held a mirror up to the lives of lesbians all over the Western world, fighting injustice and celebrating personal victories, and all the time providing a community to those of us who were struggling to find a place in our own.

But it wasn’t until some years later that I realised that a 1985 ‘Dykes to Watch Out For’ strip called ‘The Rule’ had spawned a way of looking at the world that could be useful across many parts of life. The Bechdel Test – clearly explained in this short video here – is a benchmark or litmus test used to assess the presence of women in movies. For a movie to pass the Bechdel Test it needs to contain three things:

1. Two or more female characters with names…
2. …who talk to each other…
3. …about something other than a man.

This sounds fairly straightforward but, shockingly, around half of mainstream movies – some of our most well-loved films – actually fail this test, including the original Star Wars Trilogy, Slumdog Millionaire, Avatar, The Avengers, Finding Nemo, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, the complete Lord of the Rings Trilogy, and many, many more.

Of course, just because a film passes does not mean it necessarily advances women’s rights. The Bechdel Test doesn’t assess whether something is progressive or challenging: it simply assesses whether women are present in any meaningful way. And, in a world in which women’s voices are regularly silenced, the mere presence of women is extremely important.

Over the years, the Bechdel Test has been applied or modified to assess other areas of culture including literature, journalism and even software development. And from there I believe it’s only a short hop to applying it to the contemporary beer scene. It is vital for the future of the industry that women are present on discussion panels, leading or chairing conferences, part of magazine editorial teams, present in beer education, at the centre of judging panels, represented at the highest level in brewing or consumer organisations, and called on as the experts they are to be listened to and heard. Importantly, I’m not suggesting that women are invited into male-dominated spaces solely to talk about incidents of sexism, or what it’s like being a woman in the beer industry. Making time to hear those testimonies is important but they are not the whole story – remember in order to pass the Bechdel Test, women must be talking about something other than men or their experiences at the hands of them. Inviting women into otherwise male enclaves in order to give a ‘woman’s perspective’ is also patronising, reductive and ignores the intersectional nature of all our identities in which we are defined not only by our gender – be that male, female or otherwise – but also our race, age, religion, sexuality, abilities, and so much more. It also causes us to miss out on the vast experiences and knowledge that women have amassed in their chosen fields.

The contemporary beer scene is not alone in sometimes struggling with the representation of women, and there are many examples of great work in this area. But every time women are invisible in areas of influence, every time a beer is marketed solely at men, every time a ‘beer for women’ is produced, every time we have to remind people that women were the first brewers, every time a disagreement on Twitter degenerates into macho posturing, every time craft beer lovers are portrayed as people with beards, every time a woman has to justify why she likes beer, or why offensive beer names are unacceptable, every time sexist ‘banter’ is excused, every time beer fans are greeted on social media as ‘lads’, every time the ‘women don’t drink beer’ myth is perpetuated, every time the consumption of alcohol is accepted as an excuse for sexist, racist or homophobic behaviour, we all lose out.

Having trodden the career path I have, I’m not naïve enough to propose that we should all just be kind to one another. But, at the very least, we need to hear each other’s voices. And, as such, I will continue to ensure that each edition of Fermentation Beer & Brewing Radio is Bechdel Test compliant. And I promise to loudly celebrate anyone else who, within their own field of work, commits to doing the same.

Emma can be found blogging and broadcasting on her award-winning website https://fermentationonline.com/

Christmas Day Lunch – time to bring out the beers!

30 Nov

Here’s beer sommelier, Annabel Smith’s beer suggestions for Christmas Day:

Before you open that calorie laden bottle of Prosecco, or hangover inducing Chateauneuf-de-Pape with your turkey dinner this year, take some advice from the Dea Latis crew and reach for the beer.

Beer has no problem with any of the traditional comestibles we devour on Christmas day, and what’s more, it’s better for you, contains less calories and you’ll wake up on Boxing Day feeling far fresher!

We’ll start with a plate of smoked salmon for breakfast. Pour yourself a glass of refreshing, fizzy wheat beer, such as Vedett White, Erdinger Heffeweisse or Franziskaner Weissebier. Make sure it’s in a champagne flute; the carbonation and citrus will slice through the oiliness of the salmon with a knife, refreshing the palate and complementing the fish. For the veggies amongst you, bake a whole Camembert and serve with chunks of bread, accompanied by Leffe Blonde or Affligem Tripel. These beers blow wine out of the water with their sweet breadiness.

With a clear head, you can start on the star attraction – the turkey. Substitute the cranberry sauce with a cheeky glass of Titanic Plum Porter. The fruitiness of this beer is a perfect foil to the delicate flavours of white meat. If pork is your meat of choice, there’s no better beer than Jenning’s Cumberland Ale, it’s got a lovely apple peel aroma and flavour. For the nut roast gals out there, we recommend the gorgeous Brooklyn lager, full of toffee, caramel and sweet notes.

Onto the Christmas pudding, reach for Shepherd Neame Bishop’s Finger or Robinson’s Old Tom – both are full of stewed and dried fruit flavours which complement the richness of the dessert.

Here comes the cheeseboard, laden with Stilton, and we’re going to be drinking Theakston’s Old Peculier or Fullers London Porter. Both there beers tone down the metallic, coppery elements in the cheese. It’s a weird combination but it works so well!

And finally…well Christmas wouldn’t be Christmas without a chocolate or two. Settle back and sip a glass of Liefman’s Kriek to recreate that cherry liqueur experience

Dea Latis hosts beer and cheese tasting

10 Oct

Dea Latis beer + cheese

Beer and women group Dea Latis hosted a beer and cheese tasting in London earlier this week, as part of its ongoing mission to encourage more women to discover the delights of our national drink.

During the tasting, guests sampled five different beer and cheese combinations, with expert guidance provided by Annabel Smith, one of the country’s only female Beer Sommeliers. They were:

  • Affligem Triple: Chaucers Camembert
  • Guinness: Organic Ashdown Foresters Smoked
  • Fullers ESB: Ashmore Farmhouse
  • Shepherd Neame Barley Wine: Kentish Blue
  • Bacchus Frambozen: Kellys Goats Cheese

A post-tasting vote was taken for the best beer and cheese pairing, with the Affligem-Camembert match narrowly taking top spot ahead of the Shepherd Neame Barley Wine with Kentish Blue.

Smith said, “The hallmark of a great match of beer and cheese, or indeed any food and drink, is that they enhance each other’s taste.  Beer works especially well with cheese, as its natural carbonation cuts through the fattiness of cheese – which is something wine can’t do.

“There were some cracking combinations tasted today, which really showcased beer’s versatility as a match to food.”

Dea Latis – named after the Celtic goddess of beer and water – was established by a handful of women working in the brewing and pubs industry, and hosts regular beer and beer/food tastings for women.

The tasting was held in the Bishop’s Finger at Smithfield, a Shepherd Neame pub. Shepherd Neame is one of 15 corporate supporters of Dea Latis, who help to promote the group’s efforts to bring beer to women.

The next event is a Beer & Breakfast tasting on Friday 5 December in London.  Put the date in your diary, more detail to follow soon.

 

Dates for your diary

5 Aug

Dea Latis will be holding a number of events for members and other beer-loving women over the next few months. Please make a note of these dates for your diaries and we’ll be sending further details shortly.

  • Thursday 25th September, lunchtime:  Beer and cheese tasting, central London. Note this is the first day of Cask Ale Week.
  • Friday 5th December, 10.00 – 12.00 am: Beer and breakfast tasting, central London.  A favourite Dea Latis event returns, on the morning after the Guild of Beer Writers’ dinner

We hope to see you at one of our events. If you’d like any further information, or have suggestions for an event you’d like us to run, please contact us at dealatisuk@gmail.com

 

Dea Latis hosts tasting at Norwich City of Ale

4 Jun

Starting with a brew Smoked salmon on mandarin & cream cheese Marmalade glazed sausages

Beer and women forum Dea Latis took its popular ‘Beers with Breakfast’ tasting to Norwich City of Ale last month, hosting a female-only tasting session at the Plasterer’s Arms in the city.

Guests enjoyed six breakfast foods, each matched to a different ale, with expert tuition from Beer Sommelier Annabel Smith, while Belinda Jennings of Adnams presented her City of Ale Saison, brewed especially for the festival.  All beers served with breakfast at the Plasterer’s were brewed by women, as part of the pub’s Fem.Ale event.

Baked Eggs with Roast Tomatoes with Brewsters Helles 4% ABV

Smoked salmon on Mandarin Salad with Adnams Saison 6.3%

Sausages cooked in marmalade with Buntingford Twitchell 3.8%

Bacon & herb sandwich on rye bread with Adnams Rye IPA 5.0%

Beer batter pancakes and maple syrup with Oldershaw Miss Red 4.4%

Chocolate Stout cake with Brentwood Smoked Porter 5.4%

The event was the third Beers with Breakfast tasting from Dea Latis, who have also paired beers with cheese, chocolate and tapas. Last September the group also ran a tasting event for female MPs in the Houses of Parliament.

Above photos show:Beer Sommelier Annabel Smith (far left) with guests; Smoked Salmon with Adnams Saison; Sausages with Buntingford Twitchell

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